What makes a burger an Aussie burger?

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Beefier than Chris Hemsworth, saucier than Margot Robbie and more Australian than Russell Crowe (who was really born in New Zealand), the Aussie burger is a national icon.

But where did Australia’s meatiest treasure originate, and what makes an Aussie burger Aussie, anyway? We investigate.

The origins of the Aussie burger with ‘the lot’

As ubiquitous as they are today, burgers are a relatively recent addition to the world and even more recent to Australia.

While the exact origins of the humble burger may never be known, most experts on the matter agree that they were invented by a chef who put a Hamburg steak between two slices of bread in a small town in Texas in the late 18th or early 19th century. Genius.

After that, burgers took a while to make the trip to Australia – several decades in fact – with the earliest sightings happening around the ‘30s, most likely thanks to our post-First World War relationship with America.

When an Aussie burger became THE Aussie burger we know today is a little murky. One theory says it coincides with the opening of the Edgell and Golden Circle canneries in the ‘20s and ‘40s, which brought a surplus of canned beetroot and pineapple to our local shores. 

Another more hilarious theory suggests the trend for putting ‘the lot’ on a burger was born from a prank on US troops visiting Australia on R&R.

In any case, our national love of the Aussie burger with the lot was cemented just shy of a century ago – and we’ve never looked back since

The anatomy of an Aussie burger

So now you know the history of the Aussie burger, what goes into one? This is a subject that’s cause for much discussion amongst foodies and pub-goers around the country. Some say pineapple is a travesty. Others say they wouldn’t be caught dead with a beetroot-soaked burger wrapper.

While there’s no legally-binding definition, most agree an Aussie burger should have…

  • A bun. Pretty self-explanatory. It wouldn’t be a burger without a bun. 
  • A meat patty. A juicy patty made with chuck or brisket steak is the name of the game.
  • Sauce. Tomato and BBQ sauce are acceptable. Save the chutneys and relishes for fancier fare.
  • A fried egg. The oozier the yolk, the better.
  • Bacon. A couple of rashers with crispy edges will do the trick.
  • Cheese. Swiss or cheddar, melted to perfection atop the meat patty.
  • Pineapple. Sweet, slightly tangy and 100% essential.
  • Beetroot. If your burger isn’t dyeing your hands purple, it doesn’t cut the mustard.
  • Lettuce, tomato and onion. The usual suspects.

Say g’day to a bloody good Aussie burger

At Ribs & Burgers, we take our role as the purveyor of this cultural symbol very seriously. That’s why our Aussie burger is served up with a 100% premium flame-grilled beef patty, juicy pineapple, perfectly cooked bacon, real beetroot, Swiss cheese, egg, pickle, and fresh lettuce, tomato, and onion. 

And don’t worry, we’d never forget Aunty Joan’s pink sauce and BBQ to finish off this masterpiece. Choose between a single or mighty double patty at Ribs & Burgers Rhodes or a location near you.

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